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Cancer Resources

American Cancer Society

For over 100 years, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has worked relentlessly to save lives and create a world with less cancer. Together with millions of our supporters worldwide, we help people stay well and get well, find cures, and fight back against cancer.

Sign & Symptoms

Signs and symptoms are both signals of injury, illness, disease – signals that something is not right in the body.

A sign is a signal that can be seen by someone else – maybe a loved one, or a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional. For example, fever, fast breathing, and abnormal lung sounds heard through a stethoscope may be signs of pneumonia.

A symptom is a signal that’s felt or noticed by the person who has it, but may not be easily seen by anyone else. For example, weakness, aching, and feeling short of breath may be symptoms of pneumonia.[1]

Read more from Cancer.org here >

Learn More About Cancer

More than one million people in the United States get cancer each year.

Whether you have cancer or are close to someone who does, understanding what to expect can help you cope. In this section you can find basic information about cancer and what causes it, as well as in-depth information about specific types of cancer, their risk factors, early detection, diagnosis, and treatment options.[1]

Learn more from Cancer.org here >

Be Safe in the Sun

In this section you can learn about some of the damaging effects that too much sun exposure can have on the skin. You'll also find tips to help you protect yourself and your family from getting too much sun.[1]

National Cancer Institute

This is the central website for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the U.S. government’s principal agency for cancer research.

Childhood Cancers

A cancer diagnosis is upsetting at any age, but especially so when the patient is a child. It’s natural to have many questions ...

Who should treat my child? Will my child get well? What does all of this mean for our family?

Not all questions have answers, but the information and resources on this page provide a starting point for understanding the basics of childhood cancer.[2]

Children's cancers are not always treated like adult cancers. Pediatric oncology is a medical specialty focused on the care of children with cancer. It's important to know that this expertise exists and that there are effective treatments for many childhood cancers.

Read more from Cancer.gov here >

Adolescents & Young Adults

About 70,000 young people (ages 15-39) are diagnosed with cancer each year in the United States – accounting for about 5 percent of cancer diagnoses in the United States. This is about six times the number of cancers diagnosed in children ages 0-14.

Young adults are more likely than either younger children or older adults to be diagnosed with certain cancers, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma, testicular cancer, thyroid cancer, and sarcomas. However, the incidence of specific cancer types varies according to age. Leukemia, lymphoma, testicular cancer, and thyroid cancer are the most common cancers among 15-24-year-olds. Among 25-39-year-olds, breast cancer and melanoma are the most common.[2]

Read more from Cancer.gov here >

A To Z List of Cancers

This list of common cancer types includes cancers that are diagnosed with the greatest frequency in the United States, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers:[2]

Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colon and Rectal Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Thyroid Cancer.

Apart from the most common types listed above, you can find a full A-to-Z list of cancer types here on Cancer.gov >

Cancer.Net

Cancer.Net provides timely, comprehensive, oncologist-approved information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), with support from the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Cancer.Net brings the expertise and resources of ASCO to people living with cancer and those who care for and about them to help patients and families make informed health care decisions.




Spirit of the Game is what puts Ultimate aside from all other sports.

E.R.I.C. is one of the main drivers behind the International Spirit of the Game Day and promotes Spirit wherever they go.

To learn more visit our Spirit Of The Game page >